February 24th through May 30th, 2015 at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

"25 years 25 artists" is an exhibition celebrating the Mexican Cultural Institute's first 25 years. This visual arts exhibition presents works from several generations and artistic movements. From the contemporaries of the third stage of Mexican muralism, to the members of the "Ruptura" in the sixties, this exhibit explores art that proposed new forms of expression and changed the way art was seen in Mexico. Featuring work from artists of diverse aesthetics, "25 years 25 artists" presents a collection of pieces produced by both Mexicans and others who were born elsewhere but produced their work in Mexico.

The exhibition will include the works of Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Feliciano Béjar, Arnaldo Coen, José Luis Cuevas, José Chávez Morado, Gunther Gerzso, Ariadne Kimberly, Joy Laville, Gabriel Macotela, Jesús Martínez, Guillermo Meza, Luis Nishizawa, Pablo O'Higgins, Arturo Rivera, Vicente Rojo, Raymundo Sesma, Francisco Toledo and Roger Von Gunten. These pieces are part of the Kimberly Collection.

The exhibit inauguration will take place February 24th at 6:45 pm.

RSVP to the inauguration here



2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
February 24th through May 30th, 2015
Opening February 24th, 6:45 pm
Monday - Friday, 10 am - 6 pm
Saturdays 12 - 4 pm
Free Admission


April 9th, 6:45 pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The Mexican Cultural Institute in collaboration with the University of Maryland is proud to present The Dilemma of the Gods and the Familiarity of the Kings: Constructions of Aztec Identity in Early Colonial Mexico, a talk by Elizabeth Boone (Tulane University). The talk will put into dialogue Bernardino de Sahagún's and other chroniclers' images of the Aztec gods and the Aztec kings to show how the ancient deities were constructed from an array of discursive practices, whereas the lords easily remained within their Preconquest frame.

The Dilemma of the Gods and the Familiarity of the Kings: Constructions of Aztec Identity in Early Colonial Mexico is part of the inter-disciplinary symposium Entangled trajectories: integrating Native American and European histories, which will explore how the encounters between European and Amerindian cultures after 1492 contributed to the first age of globalization. Unlike many histories that cast Native Americans and Native cultures primarily as passive victims of colonizers' actions and ideas, this event investigates the role of native actors in the creation of the modern world in both hemispheres. Thirteen invited scholars prominent in their fields will present their cutting-edge research on the shared histories of Native America and early modern Europe from multiple disciplinary perspectives, including those of history, art history, literature, cultural anthropology, and philosophy.


More info

RSVP here




Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
April 9th, 6:45 pm


All Sessions 6:45pm at the Mexican Cultural Institute

 

The 2015 season kicks off on April 23rd when Mexican Table returns to celebrate the 25th Silver Anniversary of the MCI by preparing a menu in homage to Mexico's Silver Route. In the colonial era, this route connected Mexico City to Zacatecas, the premier mining area, passing through Queretaro, Guanajuato, Aguascalientes and San Luis Potosí. The menu will take its inspiration from that era and route, so you will be able to sample both the flavors and the history. On Saturday June 13 the Institute will host the first Mexican Table for Kids (ages 8 - 12 only, limit 30 participants), so stay tuned for the announcement. Then, on December 3rd Mexican Table will focus on the culinary riches from the north of México -- Monterrey, Nuevo León. Pati will co-host this event with a featured chef from that area to close the year in grand northern style.

Tables fill as reservations are made. If you wish to sit with friends but have purchased tickets individually, please contact Pilar Orozco at porozco@instituteofmexicodc.org.









Mexican Cultural Institute
2829 16th Street NW DC
More Info here